Management Success Tip #174: If Engaged Employees Are Great, Inspired Employees Are Even Better!

Recent research shows that although engaged employees are by far better for your company’s productivity than dissatisfied or even satisfied employees, inspired employees outpace even engaged employees by over 150%!

The table below tells the tale:

Inspired Employees are Most Productive Employees

 

 

 

 

 

 

So how do you get your employees up past the satisfied level into engaged, busting into inspired?

Garton and Mankins suggest that you start by looking at foundational elements: “If people are constantly struggling with unnecessary meetings, cumbersome approval processes, and routine obstacles, they are unlikely to be satisfied, let alone engaged or inspired.”

Ask yourself, for example: how many meetings can you slash from your employees’ calendar? Including virtual ones? How can you better streamline the meetings that are actually necessary? Can you tighten up the agenda?

What is your approval process? Is there duplication of steps? As simplistic as it may sound, people prefer a one click-through process to a three or four clicks-through to get something done. How close is your approval process to a “one-click” style?

And so on. Review your basics, and you have much better chances of cultivating an environment where employees are inspired, not just doing what it takes to get by.

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Management Success Tip #173: Don’t Force Your Square Peg Employee into a Round Hole Job!

#173 Square peg round holeYou know the expression “square peg in a round hole”?  It’s usually used when we’re describing someone who just doesn’t fit in with something: like a very relaxed, mellow, easy-going fellow who’s joined the Armed Forces. Not likely to succeed! Unless somehow he forces his laid-back personality into the tight structure required by the military.

Well, all too often, managers can inadvertently “square peg round hole” an employee. By that I mean that at one time or another, the employee’s skill set and job matched up, but that over time, either the employee or the job changed, such that it isn’t a match any more.

Rather than determinedly try to seminar, coach, teach, partner-up and in general force your square peg employee into that round hole job, consider a different approach.

Take a moment, and evaluate your employee’s current strengths. What he/she brings to the workplace that is of great value. Now, how can you re-configure your employee’s responsibilities so that he/she is operating from those strengths? Because only when an employee is able to operate from their strengths a majority of the time, will they feel effective. And it’s only when we feel effective that we can actually be effective.

It’s in the best interests of your company and your employees, for them to be using their best skills.

Yes, it may take some juggling of responsibilities: perhaps the employee you’re working with can assume some responsibilities previously assigned to a different position, and vice versa. But the payoff in terms of increased productivity and improved performance will be worth it.

Should you allow your employee to only operate from their strengths? No. It’s healthy and stimulating to be challenged out of our comfort zone. We all need some impetus to reach and grow. However, spending too much time and effort out of one’s comfort zone eventually erodes self-confidence and with it, ability.

There’s a balance here, and a wise manager respects that. Evaluate your employee’s strengths, and proceed from there.