Management Success Tip #170: Agree Upon Goals, Expectations and Standards for Maximum Employee Productivity and Company Success

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Your employees want to perform well. They want to be productive. Yes, they really do, despite the fact that it sometimes (often?) may not seem that way.

Or at least employees want to do well when they actually know what they’re supposed to be doing! Too often, managers assume that workers should know what they’re supposed to do, how to do it, how often, and by when (and you know what the informal definition of “assume” is). All this because the employees were told once or twice. Or it’s in the job description. Or worse–in the employee manual (updated every decade or so).

That’s mistreatment of a potentially great employee! Instead, take the time to set agreed-upon goals and expectations. Not just your goals, your expectations, but those you sat down with your employee and together, figured out the hows, whys, whats and wherefores thereof. Fancy talk for if you don’t spend the time to make sure you and your employee are on the same page with what is needed, it won’t happen.

Similarly, don’t leave your employees in the dark as to what are the standards set to earn a bonus or other reward. An employee may think he or she has done stellar work, and fully (and rightfully) expects some sort of recognition, only to find out that whatever-it-was had to be completed during the first quarter of the year to qualify for a bonus. Aargh! Major disappointment, unhappy employee–their performance tanks, no big surprise.

Clarify goals and standards. Discuss these with your employees. Write down whatever you’ve agreed on. Both your company and your employees will benefit tremendously.

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Management Success Tip #169: Your Company’s Higher Purpose Will Attract Purpose-Driven, High Performing Employees

Image courtesy of kai4107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There’s a story told of bricklayers carefully applying mortar to brick, constructing a wall. Most of them, when asked “What are you doing,” replied, “Building a wall” (“duh” implied). But one bricklayer, when asked what he was doing, replied, “I’m building a cathedral.” As indeed, in the bigger picture, he was.

Today’s workers want to be building cathedrals. Not in the literal sense, of course, but in the sense of greater purpose.

Increasingly, workers are asking that their jobs have meaning, have a purpose. That the companies they work for, the workplace where they spend the majority of their waking hours, have a social mission, or at the very least, a purpose greater than simply selling widgets.

For example, Kickstarter, the crowdfunding platform, redefined its corporate structure so as to prioritize its social mission (funding creative projects) over profits: it became a public benefit corporation. With that, Kickstarter’s jobs page received a stunning increase in visits of 33%.

Now, where “purpose-driven employees” and “profits” align, is that workers who are purpose-driven, will work harder for companies with a greater purpose. So it is in your best interest, not only to look for potential hires who are purpose-driven, but to define your company’s purpose in a way that will attract those very hires, support their best performance, and retain them.

Your statement of greater purpose must be genuine, however. Purpose-driven workers are quick to sniff out any attempt at manipulation-via-greater-purpose-statement, and with the help of social media, the backlash would be swift and merciless.